Inherited Disorders of Renal Magnesium Handling

The genetic basis and cellular defects of a number of primary magnesium wasting diseases have been elucidated over the past decade. This review correlates the clinical pathophysiology with the primary defect and secondary changes in cellular electrolyte transport.

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Indomethacin for Growth

Neonatal Bartter syndrome differs from the classical Bartter syndrome in the occurrence of antenatal presentation with polyhydramnios. Nephrocalcinosis and severe growth retardation are common sequelae. Indomethacin has been reported to improve linear growth, but its use in the early newborn period has been infrequently described.

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Bartter Syndrome in Two Generations

Bartter’s syndrome (BS) is characterized by primary renal tubular hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hyperreninemia, hyperaldosteronism and normal blood pressure. The parents and siblings of a BS patient were evaluated for renal tubular function. The father and all 9 siblings of the patient had biochemical features of BS.
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Magnesium and Electrolytes in Head Injury Cases

Hypomagnesemia and hypophosphatemia at admission in patients with severe head injury

Objective: Low serum levels of electrolytes such as magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), and phosphate (P) can lead to a number of clinical problems in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, including hypertension, coronary vasoconstriction, disturbances in heart rhythm, and muscle weakness.

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Magnesium in the Brain, MS Patients

Abstract:

Magnesium (Mg) concentrations were studied in the brains of 4 patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) and 5 controls. The magnesium contents were determined by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry in autopsy samples taken from 26 sites of central nervous system tissues, and visceral organs such as liver, spleen, kidney, heart and lung.

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Magnesium Lowers Blood Pressure

Magnesium supplementation can cause small but significant decreases in blood pressure, according to a report by Dr. Yuhei Kawano and colleagues of the National Cardiovascular Center in Osaka, Japan. The study enrolled 60 persons aged 33 to 74 years. All participants received either a daily magnesium supplement (480 milligrams) or placebo over two separate 8-week periods.

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Metabolic Alkalosis

Metabolic alkalosis is common–half of all acid-base disorders as described in one study [1] . This observation should not be surprising since vomiting, the use of chloruretic diuretics, and nasogastric suction are common among hospitalized patients. The mortality associated with severe metabolic alkalosis is substantial; a mortality rate of 45% in patients with an arterial blood pH of 7.55 and 80% when the pH was greater than 7.65 has been reported [2] . Although this relationship is not necessarily causal, severe alkalosis should be viewed with concern, and correction by the appropriate intervention should be undertaken with dispatch when the arterial blood pH exceeds 7.55.

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Bartter Abstracts

Medical journals online will show a summary of medical articles. The summary is called an “abstract”. Sometimes just reading the abstract will tell you enough. Sometimes after reading an abstract you might want to read the full article. Then you can go to a medical library or public library and ask them to obtain the article for you. There are 23 abstracts listed.

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Gitelman Abstracts

Medical journals online will show a summary of medical articles. The summary is called an “abstract”. Sometimes just reading the abstract will tell you enough. Sometimes after reading an abstract you might want to read the full article. Then you can go to a medical library or public library and ask them to obtain the article for you. There are 7 abstracts listed.

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Magnesium Abstracts

edical journals online will show a summary of medical articles. The summary is called an “abstract”. Sometimes just reading the abstract will tell you enough. Sometimes after reading an abstract you might want to read the full article. Then you can go to a medical library or public library and ask them to obtain the article for you. There are 54 abstracts listed, covering magnesium and ADD, asthma, allergies, heart disease, chronic fatigue, depression diabetes, fibromyalgia, high blood pressure, kidney stones, leg cramps, migraines, multiple sclerosis, premenstrual syndrome, pregnancy, preemies, seizures, SIDS, and stress.

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